Sweat the Details with Natalie Papier

Sweat The Details Natalie Papier

Let’s Talk Interior Design – Installment 1

This week on Sweat the Details, Keith and Jim are joined by Nest’s Storyteller and Editor-in-Chief of NEST Magazine, Jasmine Bible, to kick off a series of interior design-focused interviews. For this first installment, we speak with Natalie Papier, a professional Interior Designer, who recently moved from Chicago to Charlotte, and is an Instagram Trendsetter.

Natalie Papier

We discuss interior design in the time of COVID, where her passion for design began, her move from Chicago to Charlotte, and her path to opening her own design firm. Find Natalie on Instagram and her website.

You can listen to the podcast here, and subscribe here.  

For a bit of context, here are a few images of her images of her colorful and vibrant home, as seen on her Instagram feed:

Natalie Papier

Natalie Papier

Natalie Papier

Natalie Papier

Natalie Papier

 


Transcript

Jim:
Hey, this is Jim Duncan with Nest Realty and Sweat the Details. This week, Keith and I were joined by Nest’s storyteller, Content Manager, and Editor in Chief of the Nest Magazine, Jasmine Bible, and Natalie Papier, a professional interior designer who recently moved from Chicago to Charlotte. We talked about interior design in the time of COVID, where her passion for design began, her move from Chicago to Charlotte, and her path to opening her own design firm. This is the first in a series of podcast based on design. Hope you enjoy.

Jim:
Hey, everybody. Jim Duncan with Nest Realty, it’s Sweat the Details, sitting here with Natalie Papier, our guest this week, and we are bringing on Jasmine Bible and Keith Davis, my partner at Nest. We’re here to talk about design and colors and all sorts of manner of things that associate with real estate and not real estate. Natalie, give us a brief background on who you are, what you do

Natalie:
Well, thanks for having me. I’m excited to be here, especially given how much time I’m spending around small children. It’s nice to talk to adults. I am an interior designer. The name of my company is Home-ec and I recently relocated from Chicago to Charlotte in January, right before this epic pandemic. I’m just finding my new footing here and understanding what the new normal looks like.

Jim:
How long have you been doing this?

Natalie:
Interior design?

Jim:
Yeah.

Natalie:
I’ve been in the business now for four years. As soon as my daughter went into kindergarten, I just felt this pull towards something. It was just an organic process that happened. I have an art background and after a while, I didn’t have time to paint. My house became a new canvas and at a certain point, this started getting some appreciation from friends and family. I thought, “Maybe I can do this. Maybe I can do this as a job.” Surprisingly so, or maybe not surprisingly it’s worked out rather well for me.

Jim:
What was the draw from Chicago to Charlotte?

Natalie:
Well, my husband works for a company, Nuveen, which is based in Chicago and they incorporated TIAA, which is down here in Charlotte. He was working down here quite a bit more and he really liked the team he was working for. I think we were both feeling ready for a change and maybe no more polar vortex winters and a little bit more outdoor time and space. I mean, it’s been pretty ideal. This weather in general just makes me feel 1,000 times more sane.

Keith:
Yeah. Mid-Atlantic as it has a bit more temperate climate.

Jim:
If you’ve made it through your first summer in Charlotte, then, then you’re good on the humidity and heat that we will. It definitely will be, you do have, you may not have the wind and the cold in the winter, but you do have, the North Carolina summer.

Natalie:
Oh, for sure. I think my vitamin D deficiency has, like now I can’t not be outside. I get FOMO if I’m inside the house.

Keith:
We were talking yesterday, Natalie … God bless, excuse me. Three out of three, Dave. We were talking yesterday, Natalie, about how you go into your client’s homes and repurpose spaces. Have there been any that you’ve gone into that really jumped out at you as one that you walked in and immediately had a feel for how you envisioned that space that your clients could not see?

Natalie:
I think the one reason why I feel pretty confident in what I do is because I can see that vision pretty quickly. It’s not always what people would expect.

Keith:
What do you mean?

Natalie:
I think sometimes I come in and I’m like, “Okay, this has so many possibilities.” Then I say it out loud and people look at me and they’re like, “Whoa, Whoa, that’s a lot. I’m not sure. I’m not sure how I feel about that.” Then, through this transformation of bringing their own personality into a space and finding what inspires them and making their home reflect that, it’s a beautiful thing.

 

Jasmine:
Jasmine Bible here. I’m the storyteller and editor of Nest Magazine, popping in on this podcast to join you guys talking all things design. Natalie, do you think that because you have such a maximalist, layered, textured approach to your design, that those are the clients that are gravitating towards you?

Natalie:
For sure. If you’re really into minimal Scandinavian bare bones style, you’re probably not going to call me, and that’s okay. There is a place for all different kinds of designers and I find myself really drawn to more of the eclectic, colorful.

Jasmine:
The clients coming to you are probably ready. Yeah. They’re ready to make that leap, and that’s why they’re coming to you.

Natalie:
They are, and I think they’re ready now, especially, given how much time that we’re spending in home, that our homes need to be a place of joy and happiness.

Keith:
Yeah. Have you seen this space of, we’re all living in our homes a whole lot more now. Are there any notable repurposing of spaces that you’ve seen or that you’ve done that jumps out as that was something that the client … You matter in the process as well, but the client, they said, “Holy cow, Natalie, we never would have done this and our lives are better because of it.”

Natalie:
You know, it’s interesting because a lot of, I would say the newer homes now, have what is traditionally called formal spaces, and nobody’s living this formal lifestyle anymore. It’s all about utilizing all the spaces in your house and how can it function better for you? Especially now that we’re all home and the kids are doing their schoolwork here, it’s like, how are we using these rooms? Are we sitting in this formal room and entertaining? No, we’re not. Let’s think about how we can better utilize the spaces that we have.

Natalie:
Even back in Chicago, we had clients that had formal dining rooms and they had the eating kitchen and they had this nice family dynamic happening and they never used their dining room. What do you do with that space? In a couple of times, three times actually, we’ve changed a dining room space, a formal dining room space, into being more of a lounge area where you can listen to music or read. It can be more of an office type situation or multifunctional. You can sit there, read a book, listen to music, get some work done, whatever your needs are at that given moment.

Jim:
Yeah. Keith, you had a question earlier that, if you could revisit about the photography that she does?

Keith:
Well, I think, Natalie, one of the things I was just looking through as we were kind of preparing to talk with you is, obviously Instagram is a huge part of your business. It’s a way that you can advertise past clients. It’s a way that you can make proposals if you will, to new clients in terms of introductions to your work and your style. I think one of the things that I found most fascinating was that we do photography every day in real estate. Our goal tends to be to maximize space, size appearance. It’s to make things obviously appealing, but it’s really to, it’s to showcase the size of the volume of spaces a lot of times.

Keith:
I think what’s interesting is that we tend to shoot from angles. We tend to do a diagonal shot across a room that gives us the greatest length or width of the room. Whereas when your design work is being done and what I’m seeing on your Instagram feeds on your websites, you really take a head-on approach of the photography. I just wanted to ask you why that angle, why that direction, what drives that or is there a reason for it? Is it just, that’s the best feel for the, you’re trying to accent a piece? How does that come in to your work?

Natalie:
You know, it’s interesting, because I don’t think I’ve ever been asked that question before and it’s really given me pause. Why do I do that? I think artistically, it’s about framing a shot and getting this moment on camera. Maybe that’s just a little glimpse of highlighting art and then the ceiling in artistic approach. Also, I find that even when I’m in someone’s home, we’re looking for those cozy spaces. We’re looking not to just sit in a vast room, but just to have these cozier moments. For me, it’s maybe a little bit of an artistic photography style, and maybe part of it to me just symbolizes a cozier moment.

Keith:
Let me ask, though, because you had said something in an earlier statement that maybe, take a note on this, but I’m also, my eyes are very much drawn to the statues behind you in your … I wish in many ways, I wish this podcast were being done in a visual so our listeners could see it also, but clearly within the design element, you’re trying to create a focal point in every room. Right? Do those focal points tend to come from existing client pieces? Do they tend to be things that you find for spaces? How do you approach, how do you begin that process?

Natalie:
I think Jasmine can relate here, too, that sometimes it comes from a certain piece of art or something that’s meaningful to someone. It’s about taking that and maybe pulling a color palette from it, or finding a way for it to be better featured in the space. If you have one inspiration, you can pull from that a thousand different ways. You can use those colors and paint a ceiling or bring in more interest that ends up highlighting that piece more. I think a lot of people are like, “Well, that’s too much happening. Then you’re not going to see that piece anymore.” For designers, it’s about highlighting those pieces in a way that feels more cohesive, but also just a little bit more interesting.

Keith:
I tell my clients when I’m representing buyers, that when they move into a new home, I tell them to live there for six, nine, 12 months to get a feel for the home, for how that space is, how they’re going to live there. You have the vision. Clearly, you have the vision to execute. Do you have pushback? If you go into someone’s house and say, and you say, “Okay, well it’s three days after closing, you should do this.”? What does that experience like with you and your client base?

Natalie:
I think a lot of people want immediate gratification in this world, right? I want it to be done. I just want it to be done. I want to love it and I want it to be done, but it’s such a process. I try to tell people that, to enjoy the process of it. Yes. Live in your house. What do you like about it? What gives you joy in this space? What do you hate about this room? Those are questions that pose first before you just jump in and be like, “Okay, let’s paint the walls blue.” Why are we painting the walls blue? It’s about understanding both their personality and the pieces that you have and how that room is functioning. You’re right in telling people, “Give it a minute and see how you’re using this space.” Now for me, I gave this a hot second before I got in and started doing everything, because that’s another level of crazy.

Jasmine:
That’s a designer brain. You can’t turn it off. You get into a room and you’re immediately like, “This and this and this.” I love what you just said, though. For Nest Magazine, we interview designers all the time and I’ve never heard the approach of going into a space and first asking the client, “What do you love about this space? What do you hate about this space?” That’s such a brilliant starting point. You can Pinterest and Instagram away these rooms that have no relation to the space that you’re standing in. First evaluating your own actual space is just such a brilliant starting point.

Natalie:
There’s a lot of elements to that. What kind of lighting does this room get? What is the mood that you’re looking for here? It’s more than just, make it a pretty room. It’s got to appeal to all the senses.

Jasmine:
I think that also ties back into, Keith, your earlier question about photography for Natalie, the head-on poses that she’s offering are visual storytelling, right? She’s telling about all those moments in the photo, all those eclectic pieces, vintage, brand new, taken from the homeowner’s existing collection, with different layers of patterns and textures and things. There’s so much to each of those frames, where I think for real estate, often the room is either staged or empty.

Keith:
Right.

Jasmine:
If you took a straight on picture of a wall, it would just be the most boring thing to look at. I think it doesn’t serve the purpose to take those dramatic head-on shots, unless you were standing in a house that had multicolored ceilings and different textures and things.

Jim:
Do you have clients with whom you are engaged for years? Tell me about that process and that timeline. I can’t imagine it’s a two-month process, years, perhaps?

Natalie:
I think that has been the most fun for me. What I have found has worked best for me and my clients is, you get in their house and they have a need. Then you start to know them and you start to know them pretty personally. It’s their home. How do you use these spaces? This is art you have. This is from your family, generations passed down.

Natalie:
You get to know them and you get to know their personality. It becomes a process of like really personal relationship where they want to continue this relationship with you, not just to make their house pretty, but you’ve dug deep down into their psyche and what their needs are, and then it translates into transforming their home into this place of haven for them.

Jasmine:
Have you ever had a client design a space and then ask, and then come back to you and say, “You know what? We’re not using it the way we thought we were. Can you come back and redesign it a second time?”

Natalie:
That has not happened yet.

Jim:
Good answer. It’s funny because I take it a different way, which is, how often you have clients who call you into redesign the public spaces in their house and then realize, “Wow, we love this. Now we have to have the other rooms done as well.” Right? That there’s now a disconnect of how incredible apace A is, but B now doesn’t quite blend.

Jasmine:
Right.

Natalie:
That’s the best, because once we have already established that relationship and did a really cool room that they’re happy with, it’s super easy to continue that on, even more so, because you’ve already set the foundation in one room, it’s about bringing that cohesion throughout.

Jasmine:
Then they trust you and your wild ideas.

Natalie:
All my crazy ideas keep getting crazier, and then they let me loose.

Jim:
On that, though, what’s a crazy idea that … Two things: one, what’s a crazy idea that your clients loved, and what’s a crazy idea that they said, “Yeah, no. You do that in your own house.”

Natalie:
Well, I think Jasmine can relate to the painted ceiling things. I think once a client sees like, “Oh my gosh. Wow, you can just add color there. I would have never thought of that.” It becomes something unique and just funky, fun.

Jim:
Yeah. We talked about yesterday, we were prepping for this a little bit, the stories of dead space. Now, a lot of the houses we have in today’s world are just dead spaces. You walk in, there’s no way to use it. You mentioned earlier, making a dining room into a lounge. What are some other dead spaces that you see commonly that you go in and you immediately say, “I have a solution for that.”

Natalie:
The most obvious said spaces are formal front rooms and formal dining rooms. Like those are just always useless spaces. Really, that tends to be the two biggest spots that aren’t used because everybody has either some kind of den or basement where everything is thrown in and that’s where the kids play. That’s useful. It might not always look pretty, but that, areas that people want to look pretty and they want to utilize are always on that first floor, public space area.

Jim:
Are there any trends that you see coming? Well, and I don’t know the answer to this question. Are there any trends that in Chicago, you tried to translate to Charlotte, that were accepted there? I don’t know how designed, how geographic geographical it is.

Natalie:
It’s interesting, because I think the house, a lot of the time, dictates a little bit of what you do. You have to take in consideration the bones and the character of the house. I was in an old Victorian, so a lot of the houses back where we were, were these period homes. Talk about formal-ness. Nobody wants to live in a stuffy Victorian anymore with all this heavy woodwork, especially when everything right now is about light and bright. There’s a way to respect the bones and have them even more so highlighted by doing smart things, design-wise, around it and bringing in modern elements.

Natalie:
That is my favorite combination where you get that a little bit of the old, a little bit of the new, and that makes for magic. Then it never becomes a trend or dated because you’re using all these different styles. You’re not trying to just do what’s on trend in 2020. You’re respecting the bones of the house, which are 1886, and you’re bringing in all these pieces from your life. Then you might be bringing in some modern touches of like, “Okay, well, pink is really on trend. I’m finding these cute pink pillows everywhere.” Go ahead. Buy all the pillows you want. Those are easy to replace.

Keith:
Natalie, let me ask you, though. In terms of that transition from Charlotte, from Chicago to Charlotte, architecture is a very different … There’s obviously, both have a pretty broad, very time period, but North Carolina really grew during the tobacco baron eras of the early 1900s, lots of the architecture pre- World War Two design. That has translated to continue. Even the new construction today mimics the revivalist architecture of the thirties versus Chicago, which has much more contemporary architecture along with the Victorians, along with a high art Tudor piece. Tell me, how does your design style change with that or what is … Do you tend to work with the older homes? Do you tend to work in new construction? Has as that shifted for you from Chicago to Charlotte?

Natalie:
There has been a little bit of a shift. I would say the reason why is exactly what you just tapped in on, is the houses that I was in, this era of houses and these older Tudors and Victorians and foursquares, they’re room by room by room. There is not this open floor plan that you see with all these newer build homes. In Charlotte, I’m noticing a lot of these homes, they’re mimicking that old architecture, but the inside is more conducive to this open floor plan that seems to work best with families. It really is. You have to be very thoughtful about designing in those spaces because everything flows together. It has to become something of a cohesion. It’s almost never like, “Let’s work on the kitchen.” It’s like, “Let’s work on this kitchen, breakfast nook, family room, because they call connect and speak to each other.”

Jim:
Are you finding …

Natalie:
Maybe that makes me even busier?

Jim:
Are you finding yourself working with more newer … When I say newer, I don’t mean 2020 construction, but post-2000 construction work in Charlotte, or are you more working still with the older, just older homes that have been opened up over the years?

Natalie:
This is what I find the most exciting is because the architecture here is so all over the map, I get to be in so many different kinds of style process now.

Jim:
Sure.

Natalie:
That is really fun. Like there’s a house in my neighborhood that it’s this European, very grand feeling home. Then I’m working in a really cute family ranch down the street. That’s more, mid-century modern. It never gets boring, because these aren’t cookie cutter suburban houses. Some of them are, but when you live in a place like Charlotte, that’s just grown through the years or any bigger city, you’re getting different eras of homes. With that, you’re just seeing so many different styles.

Jasmine:
Do you have a couple of go-to tricks for when you do enter a home that is void of architectural interest? What are your first grand ideas of how to elevate them?

Natalie:
There’s always ways to add interests, right? One of my favorite is, if you have a very boxy house, you don’t need to fancy it up with this molding on the walls. If that doesn’t suit the house itself, you can always play with things like wallpaper and paint and layers and not have to … Bringing in vintage is always going to bring in character. I make sure that is always at the forefront of it, too.

Jim:
What is a trend that you would like to see die?

Natalie:
Oh God, can we just be done with the eighties? All this eighties revival stuff. I’m like, “I’ve lived that.” It’s probably all my parents thought, when I am getting all this sixties, seventies stuff.

Jim:
I will say that-

Jasmine:
It is fascinating, the things that we found atrocious are suddenly all the rage.

Natalie:
I like trends for, there’s always something I like about a trend. There’s always some little piece or color scheme that is attractive and fun to play with, but I just, I cannot stand when anybody goes whole hog into it, because you are dating yourself immediately by doing that. Just bits and pieces, sprinkle it around.

Jim:
I will say, within, this is not necessarily the design side. This is the real estate sales side. Within the trends that we see, I just want to strangle every agent who says a tract house that happened to be built in 1955 is not a mid-century modern, like clam shell molding around a window with absolutely no depth to it whatsoever, is not a style that we want to accentuate. I do laugh at, when certain terms make their way into the real estate portfolio that just don’t make sense on an architectural style. We steal them and we use them and we try and, “Oh, it’s a rancher.” No, it’s mid-century modern. It doesn’t fit.

Keith:
Yeah, go ahead.

Jasmine:
No, go ahead.

Keith:
Natalie it’s fascinating hearing your different perspective between Charlotte and Chicago. Is there one thing that you’ve really found that you love about the architecture of Chicago, of Charlotte that you see consistently, that you’ve been able to implement in your design style?

Natalie:
I felt like there’s a lot more consistency where I was outside Chicago, because there was just all these … There was like basically four different style homes and a lot of them were historic, so had to be preserved to a certain point. Instead of knocking a house down and building a new monstrosity, it was more about preserving these older homes. Here, I feel like, because it’s constantly just expanding and expanding, there’s all these little pockets of these plantation style homes. I think the traditional Southern house, from what I have seen, is like that white plantation style, black shutters, very classic. I love it. I think it’s beautiful, and my house is white and black on the inside. My whole point is, your house doesn’t need to show off on the outside. It can look nice and fit right in the neighborhood, but when you come in, you can be like, “Oh, unexpected.”

Jim:
Yeah, there was, there was a fabulous architect that I worked with many years ago in Richmond who said his dream was to find somebody whose house was, who came to them because their house had been destroyed by some disaster, either fire or something, that had a beautiful lot in an old neighborhood. His goal was to build a house that was a 1935 gorgeous Greek Revival or some form of Georgian Revival home. As soon as you walked in the front door, it was all glass and concrete and steel that from the street, no one would know what it was. You could never do this with an older home. You would never find someone willing to let you do it. His goal was, he said he wanted to create a modern, beautiful home, but in a neighborhood that fit in perfectly with that revivalist architecture style. I think it would have really … Bob would have done it. It was a cool design that he wanted to make.

Jim:
I do think Charlotte with its growth, you have a lot of new construction that’s happening. You do have tear downs. You also have the renovations and the Myer Park type neighborhoods that are just gorgeous, old homes that are worthy of staying put, from the outside, at least.

Natalie:
It’s also interesting. You can have a new home and still have that old home character. It just has to be [crosstalk 00:26:12].

Jim:
Thoughtful.

Natalie:
This house, it was built in the 1990s. You would never know it. It has all this old molding and a Chateau, European style feel. Granted, all of the hardware is brushed nickel that I’m slowly replacing because it was the nineties and that’s what you’re doing.

Jasmine:
For our listeners, do you have to pop over to Natalie’s Instagram feed, which is home underscore ec underscore O-P. H-O-M-E, underscore, E-C, underscore O-P. You’ll see the incredibly vibrant, beautiful space that Natalie is speaking to us from, that I am shocked that it was built in the nineties. There’s so much character. Even the glasswork like the window panes, are so intricate. That’s amazing. Someone did that in the nineties.

Natalie:
To your point too, it’s like nothing feels too precious. I don’t feel like I’m preserving any nineties architecture. You know, it gives you a little bit more leeway to come in here and be like, “Okay, let’s take the good parts. Then the parts that are bad, we’ll change that.” I think with every house, you have that opportunity. It’s about, what are the good parts? Keep that. What are the bad parts? How can we mix them into this beautiful soup?

Jasmine:
Have you structurally changed anything in your home?

Natalie:
Yeah. The kitchen was very closed off and had a totally different layout. We opened that up. Yeah. We’ve changed quite a bit, but the actual layout of the house is the same.

Jasmine:
Is there anything that people are starting to trend more from? Sorry, Jim. Do you think people are starting to trend.

Natalie:
more from open concept, more to dedicated spaces? I think if you have open concept, you still have to have dedicated spaces. Otherwise, it’s like being inside of very loud box. Some of that is just done with layering and you don’t have to build walls to have dedicated spaces. There are cool, functional design things that you could do, like put up cute little room dividers that function as design, but also give the room a little bit more defined space.

Jasmine:
Yeah. How do you delineate those spaces visually using rugs or paint colors? What are some of your go-to tricks for that?

Natalie:
Yes. All of the above: rugs, furniture, and even placing the furniture, just not on a wall, but in between. Then you’re adding a sofa table so it looks intentional, but you’re still breaking up this gigantic rectangle.

Jim:
I think you’re seeing a lot of people are re-purposing spaces because now you have two parents at home working and they need home offices. Now you have one, two, three kids who need their own home offices. God, this world. On that, you say rugs. What are some things that people could go out and make their space more welcoming and functional like that? Just, if you expand on that a bit?

Natalie:
Textiles are your friend. Get all the rugs. Get the pillows. That is immediate cozy. It will give your room, not that echo-y quality, especially when you’re at home and everybody’s spending so much time at home, you want cozy spaces. You want comfortable spaces. That even goes with lighting: none of this harsh, fluorescent lighting, but low lighting and less focus on all these can lighting. Bring in some of the stuff that doesn’t hurt your eyeballs so much. That’s my technical term.

Jasmine:
Well, thank goodness led lights are now starting to come out in warmer hues.

Natalie:
Yes. Yes. There’s nothing worse than that cold color led light. It just immediately makes everything sad.

Jim:
It’s evidence of our new world with led lights, is one of the things that I make sure to tell my sellers, is make sure that all of the LEDs are the same color.

Keith:
You can’t mix and match.

Jim:
The range of colors is amazing.

Keith:
They also, especially with anyone who uses recessed lighting, the people who don’t understand, even if you do match color, but you’re not matching the actual, the spread of the light, whether it’s a down lighting, whether it’s broadcast lighting, you can get some funky rooms, especially in kitchens with cabinetry and those weird shadows that get thrown. It’s rather disturbing, really.

Natalie:
Yeah. Lighting is a huge game changer.

Keith:
Yeah.

Jim:
Well, hey Natalie, I think that at least Jasmine could talk about this all day. Keith and I are doing our best jobs to, to hold onto the conversation from a design perspective.

Natalie:
You’re doing great.

Jim:
The title of the podcast is Sweat the Details. Through your world and your lens, what is one detail that you sweat when you wake up every day, that you want to make sure you convey in your life’s work?

Natalie:
I’ve been just thinking about this. I think we’re all thinking about this, in this day and age, too. What are we sweating? I feel like I’m sweating so much recently, but it’s just making these connections, real connections, not just … It’s more of, “Hi, I miss you. How are you? How are you feeling?” Just these real life connections. I can’t go and hug someone, so just checking in and bringing that kindness and spreading it around. That goes not just in my job, in all of our jobs, in our personal lives and our families. It’s important to come back to taking your time, to just check in.

Jim:
Awesome. Awesome. Well, Natalie, thank you so much for making the time for us. We really truly appreciate it. I learned a ton and I thoroughly enjoyed the conversation. I’ll say thank you very much for your time.

Natalie:
Thank you all for having me. You guys are so fun.

Jasmine:
Thank you, Natalie.

Keith:
Natalie, it’s been great, and I just want to point out to our listeners, if you’ve enjoyed this conversation, please go to our show notes and we’ll have links to all of Natalie’s Instagram feeds, websites. Her stuff is amazing. As Jasmine said, you really need to take a look at it, because it’ll hit you with incredible force and it’s fantastic. Thanks so much for the time here. I really appreciate it.

Natalie:
If you’re in the Charlotte area and need your house beautified, you know where to go now.

Jim:
Yeah. Awesome. Thanks, you all.

Natalie:
Thank you.

Jasmine:
Thanks, you guys. Bye.

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